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Barber Supplies, Tools, and Equipment – Part 2: How to avoid leaving razor burn with your trimmer

Razor burn left on the neck after giving haircut can seriously hurt your customer satisfaction and retention rate. It is an extremely important issue that needs to be addressed early on in your barber education as you learn how to cut men’s hair.

Let me explain what I mean by razor burn. It can be as slight as a light red mark left on the back of the neck or as severe as bright red marks with broken skin. The more sensitive the skin the worse it gets.

Fortunately there is an extremely simple solution. First, you must understand how a clipper blade is designed to cut hair properly. There are two blades. One is stationary (does not move) and the other is mobile (moves back and forth). The stationary blade picks up the hair and holds it and the mobile blade (also known as the cutting blade) moves back and forth and cuts the hair.

Now you understand how the blade works but how do I avoid the razor marks? The answer is very simple. DO NOT drag the clipper in a downward motion after making the outline. Turn the clipper around and shave the hair in an upward motion. This way the hair will feed into the clipper blade properly. The stationary blade will pick up the hair and the mobile blade will cut it.

If you still are unsure look at your trimmer closely. Notice how close the cutting blade is to the stationary blade. Even the lightest pressure to the skin will expose the skin to the cutting blade causing the different levels of razor burn. Experiment by touching your finger to the blade and press down LIGHTLY and you will see what I mean.

I can’t stress enough the importance of learning this lesson early on in your barber education. This one simple yet important tip will increase your customer satisfaction and retention levels in a BIG way.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.comto learn more about this and many other barber supplies and tool tips.

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Barber Tools, Supplies, and Equipment: What you need as a professional barber – Part 1

Welcome to the first blog in a series of posts about barber tools, supplies, and equipment. Everyone has heard the saying “You are what you eat”. The same is true for your tools. You are only as good as your tools. It is impossible to give a great men’s haircut without the proper tools. You may get by with a good haircut once in a while with average tools but who wants to settle for good when greatness is possible.

Barber tools fall in to three main categories: Clippers, combs, and scissors. You must have a combination of all three to have a complete kit.

For the clippers we recommend having three. A powerful detachable blade clipper will help you remove a lot of thick hair or wet hair at once. It will also aid in cutting fade haircuts easier because the power will help to avoid leaving lines to blend out. The next clipper will be an adjustable clipper, which are perfect for cutting tapered/faded hairlines. You can easily get 4-5 blade sizes just by moving the lever. The last clipper you will need is a trimmer. This will be used for cutting outlines and shaving neck hair.

We recommend having three pairs of scissors. You will need a smaller scissor for cutting hair over your fingers which should be 5-6 ½ inches in length. A larger scissor is needed for cutting hair with the scissor over the comb technique. This scissor should be 6 ½ -8 ½ inches in length. A longer scissor allows for better control of the hair. The last scissor needed is a 40-44 tooth blending scissor. This will allow you to either blend or texturize the haircut for the perfect finish.

You will need both clipper combs and scissor combs. Your clipper comb should have a handle and the teeth should be smooth so the clipper will not get stuck on the grooves. A medium size and a larger one (flat top comb) will do the trick. You should also have a larger scissor comb for handling a lot of thick hair and a small one (finishing comb) or the fine work around the ears and on the hairline.

With the proper tools and education the sky is the limit.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.comfor more detailed video and written instruction on the Tools of the Trade.

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