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Clipper Cutting: How High To Cut A Fade With Longer Top

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, head shape, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

There are many modern and classic men’s hairstyles that require a longer top. Even though these styles require a longer top, a close taper or fade in around the outline of the haircut is required to finish off the haircut. The most important thing to keep in mind is: The longer the hair on top the lower the fade or taper should be cut. If the fade is cut to high the haircut will look out of balance. The best way to avoid this is to start the haircut by layering the top section. Next, cut the round of the head section using the top section as the guide. Before starting the fade, cut the sides and back section to give yourself a guide for the fade. After these three steps you will know exactly how high the fade should be cut to perfectly blend into the longer top.

Check out the rest of the Masters Of Barbering website for the best in online clipper cutting education.

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Clipper Cutting: Please Don’t Cut By Numbers – Part 3

Barbering or Men’s haircutting is a great business to be in and can be fun and rewarding. Being a barber can also give you a good steady income with job security. The barber business is a respected profession which should be taken seriously. We are all fortunate to be making our living this way in relaxed and relatively stress free atmosphere.

In previous blogs I wrote about why it is not a good idea to cut by numbers. In this blog I am going to give you the basic sizes of attachments and metal blades that will make it more professional and descriptive than clipper cutting by numbers.

The standard blade/attachment sizes from longest to shortest are:
– 1/2”
– 3/8”
– 1/4”
– 1/8”
– 1/16”
Anything size longer than ½” you are better off cutting with clipper over comb. Any size shorter is your adjustable clipper without an attachment, or a trimmer for the shortest. Those numbers are standard and they are: 1, 0A, 000, 0000, 00000.

When talking with the customer about how short they like to get their fade cut it is much more personalized and professional referring to the actual sizes than clipper cutting by numbers.

Stay tuned for the next blog in this series that will give real life examples to explain to customers how they get their haircut and how they should ask for it next time in the barbershop/hair salon.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the very best in clipper cutting education.

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Clipper Cutting: Please Don’t Cut By Numbers – Part 2

Barbering or Men’s haircutting is a great business to be in and can be fun and rewarding. Being a barber can also give you a good steady income with job security. The barber business is a respected profession which should be taken seriously. We are all fortunate to be making our living this way in relaxed and relatively stress free atmosphere.

In the previous blog I wrote about why it is not a good idea to cut by numbers. In this blog I am going to give you some communication tips with your customer to make finding out how they like their clipper cut easier.

The first question I like to ask is would they like to have skin showing, a light or dark shadow, or complete scalp coverage. With experience you will know which blade lengths show skin, a shadow, or cover the scalp.

The next question I ask them is to point out how high they like their fade. This is very important. Every customer is different. Even if they would like the same haircut as someone else the fade will most likely not be in the exact same area. There are a lot reasons that determine how high the fade should be other than customer preference. I have written many blogs on that topic. Just click on the “How to Fade Hair” category on the right hand side of this blog page to find them.

Lastly, I would like to give you my final reason for not cutting by numbers when giving a clipper cut. Most metal blades and attachments have different numbers on them. When it comes to plastic attachments most different brands have different numbers. A number one clip on one brand may be the longest whereas a number one clip on another brand may be the shortest. Some of them don not even have numbers on them on measurements. The metal blades are different as well. They have half sizes and different numbers from different manufacturers as well.

Keep an eye out for part 3 of this series where I tell you how to name your fades and teach your customer how to ask for his fade. This will let your customer know you know your stuff, take pride in your work, and are different from most people that cut hair
.
Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the very best in clipper cutting education.

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Clipper Cutting: Please Don’t Cut by Numbers – Part 1

Barbering or Men’s haircutting is a great business to be in and can be fun and rewarding. Being a barber can also give you a good steady income with job security. The barber business is a respected profession which should be taken seriously. We are all fortunate to be making our living this way in relaxed and relatively stress free atmosphere.

Before I get into the message of this blog I want to ask you a question. What think about a restaurant that you can order your meal by a number? This is what I think of: Fast food, mass produced, pre-prepared, in and out quickly, semi-professional at best, virtually anyone is qualified to cook or serve. Now I am going to ask you another question. Is this how you want your customers to think about you or your barbershop/hair salon?

A lot of you have probably never thought of it this way but that is exactly what your clipper cut customer thinks when you ask “What number do you get?” Most men have no idea what that means and do not know how to ask for their haircut anyway. As I have said in previous posts there was a time when the electric clipper did not exist and only a scissor and straight razor were used. There was something called a hand clipper but unless you could move your hand as fast as a motor you had a good chance of pulling as much hair as you cut.

A lot of clients wrongly associate a higher level of skill with a scissor cut vs. clipper cut. As industry professionals we need to do our best to teach our clients the education it takes to be good at clipper cutting. The fastest way to prove our client correct is to ask our clipper cut customers “What number do you get?”

Stay tuned for part 2 for instructions on how to get around clipper cutting by numbers.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the very best in clipper cutting education.

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How to Fade Hair: How High to Cut the Fade – Part 5: Hair Thickness

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, length of the bangs, shape of the head, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

In this part of the series on how to fade hair I am going to cover hair thickness. Fading hair is difficult enough but when the hair has different thicknesses throughout the head shape it becomes a lot harder. The most common difficulty you will find is when the hair is much lighter around the 1-2 finger area around the hairline also known as the semi-finish. My suggestion is whenever possible fade the hair past the lighter area into the thickest part of the hair (as long as this doesn’t take the fade so high it looks unnatural or past the round of the head). This way you won’t have to blend two different hair textures together.

As always start out with the longer blade and work down which will help you from taking the fade too high. Make sure to leave a quarter to half an inch distance in between blades to create the fading effect.
A quick tip to put the finishing touches on these difficult fades is to use a 40-50 tooth blending scissor to further blend the transition area from lighter to thicker hair. Use the fine teeth of the finishing comb and move the comb at a moderate speed so you don’t take out too much hair. You can always go over it a second time if necessary. Start cutting slightly higher than the transition area so you will only thin out the thicker hair.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the very best in online barber videos teaching how to fade hair.

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How to Fade Hair: How High to Cut the Fade – Part 4: Cowlicks

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, length of the bangs, shape of the head, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

In this blog I am going to discuss how to deal with cowlicks. Even though I could write a book on all the different kinds of cowlicks I am going to keep it simple in this short article. The first and most important thing I would like you to always remember is what I have been telling my students and barbers for years: “IT IS ONLY A COWLICK IF YOU CUT IT TOO SHORT ”. This may sound over simplified but if you don’t cut the hair too short in the crown or the pivot area the hair will not stick up. There is nothing worse than a customer walking out of a barbershop or hair salon with his hair standing up in the back.

The most difficult cowlicks to deal with are the ones on top of the head in the crown area. They can be closer to the top of the head, all the way down by occipital bone in the back, or somewhere in between.

– Always make sure to layer the top first. This will remove the weight and give you a guide to blend to. If there is too much hair on top you will lose sight of the cutting blade and most likely go too high with the clipper. If you go too high it is too late to recover.
– Depending on how strong the cowlick is or how much the hair wants to stick up or out you need to leave anywhere from an inch to three inches from the base of the cowlick for blending.
– If the cowlick is closer to the top of the head you can usually fade past the occipital bone (round of the head).
– If the cowlick is lower let the occipital bone (round of the head) push the clipper blade away from the head in an arcing motion. This will leave you enough room to blend.

Dealing with cowlicks correctly is one of the top ways you can keep a customer for life. This is the customer who has rarely received good haircuts in their life. They will appreciate you and their tip will definitely reflect that.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the best in online barbering education, barber videos, and many lessons featuring how to fade hair demonstrations.

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How to Fade Hair: How High to Cut the Fade? – Part 3:

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, length of the bangs, shape of the head, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or an older suit and tie professional. The fade customer is the most particular and hardest customer to please.

This article is going to cover how high cut the fade in relation to the length of the bangs. The height of the fade should be balanced properly with the length of the bangs. The fade should never be higher than the bangs.

This is a little tricky because with most of today’s styles the bangs are either pushed up, combed to the side, or brushed straight back. For these styles cut the top first and then comb the bangs straight forward before beginning the fade. When you are clipper cutting the sides, start arching the clipper away from the head about a half of an inch below the bangs. This will leave enough room to blend the sides to the top without fading the hair too high.

This is a little easier with the shorter styles that get an edge-up. Make sure to leave yourself enough room for blending so the fade stops where the edge-up in the temple and forehead begins.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com to learn how to fade hair with our high quality barber videos.

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How to Cut Hair: Clipper Cutting – Part 1

Clipper cutting techniques are some of the most important techniques you need to learn in your barbering education. Short hairstyles are back in a big way and here to stay. This is huge for the barbering industry and your career as a barber. Clipper cut customers on average get their haircut every 1-3 weeks which means big income potential from each customer.

That being said the short clipper cut customers tend to be very fussy. They know exactly what they want and will notice any imperfection in their haircut. If you can make them happy you have a customer for life. Another benefit is clipper cut customers have big mouths. They are not embarrassed to tell everyone they know where they got their haircut and how great their barber is.

Keep in mind when you are giving a clipper cut that your haircut will be a walking advertisement. Everywhere that customer goes your haircut is on display. Clipper cut customers think nothing of walking up to a guy they don’t know who has a great haircut and asking: Where did you get that hair cut? This works both ways though. If there is a shadow or line of demarcation in the haircut guys will also ask: Where did you get that haircut? Clipper cut customers look out for each other as well.

Please visit www.MastersOfBarbering.com for the very best in online clipper cutting education.

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How to Fade Hair: How High to Cut the Fade – Part 2:

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, head shape, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

In this blog I am going to cover scars. When you are asking the customer how high they like their fade make sure to ask them if they have any scars. If you are uncomfortable asking the customer that question, just spend an extra few seconds combing through the hair in an upward motion so when the hair is lifted you will see any scars. You will most likely find scars in 2 areas. In the temple region and/or on the occipital area which is just above the nape of the neck. If the scars are any lower than that there is not a lot that can be done. They are most likely going to show no matter what. Just make sure the customer know that before you give them the fade.

If you find scars in the higher areas leave the hair thicker or darker in those areas and fade the hair low. When cutting the fade start arching the blade or floating the blade away from the scalp about ½ inch below the scars so you have room to fade the hair just below the them. If you go any higher you will run into the scars and they will show.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for barber videos and written instructions covering how to fade hair.

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How to Fade Hair: How high to cut the fade? – Part 1:

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, head shape, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

This article will cover head shape. If the client has a rectangular shaped head there are a more options. You can fade the hair high, medium, or low and it will look balanced. If the client has a round shaped head DO NOT fade the hair higher than the widest point of the head. This will lead to an unbalanced looking haircut. If the client has a protruding occipital bone (big lump in the back of his head), fade the hair low below the bone.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com to view examples of the different types of fade haircuts and keep an eye out for follow up articles on this topic.

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