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Tag Archives | barber supplies

Barber Tools and Supplies – Proper Barber Comb and Brush Maintenance

Disinfecting your barber combs and brushes is a very important part of your job as a barber. If you do 20 haircuts in a day your barber combs are touching 20 different people. If you don’t clean them properly you will have 20 different hair clippings on them by the end of the day. There is nothing worse than a customer sitting in your barber chair and seeing dirty combs on the counter. As we have discussed in previous written and video barber blogs your customer is forming their opinion of you and the service they are about to receive before you cut one strand of hair.

In between every customer rinse all of your combs that you just used with warm water and soap. Rinse the soap completely off and immerse them in a germicide and disinfectant solution such as hydrocide or barbericide. Make sure whatever you use it kills all germs and diseases including HIV.

When you are going to use the barber comb or brush on the next customer make sure to rinse it off in warm water and dry the comb off. Do not take the comb out of the germicide/disinfectant solution and comb your customer’s hair. The barber comb or brush should be completely dry without any of the germicide/disinfectant left on it.

Check out the rest of the Masters Of Barbering website to learn more tips on how to take care of your barber tools.

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How to Cut Men’s Hair – Practice, Practice, Practice

The best wayto learn how to cut men’s hair is by cutting men’s hair. This may sound over simplified but it really is that simple. The more men’s haircuts you do the better at men’s haircutting you will become.

Now that we have that out of the way here are some tips to to get more practice and to increase the quality of your practice.

  1. Make sure you are learning the proper way. Go to a reputable school with qualified teachers.
  2. If you are going to try and pick up some tips from fellow students, make sure they are giving good haircuts. Don’t just watch them because they tell you they know what they are doing.
  3. When you are in school working on the clinic floor grab haircuts you are not comfortable with. The only way to get good at these haircuts is by practicing them. It does no good to cut fade after fade if you are already are good at them.
  4. Offer friends and their friends’ free haircuts. Keep doing it until you are comfortable with these haircuts. Giving a free haircut takes the pressure off and will lead to valuable paying customers in the future.
  5. Get a mentor. Learn from the best. Find a barber in your area or someone online who is teaching the quality of haircuts that you would like to give and learn their techniques. Practice,
    practice, practice their techniques.

I can still hear my high school football coach screaming at us “You play like you practice.” This is so true. How you perform when you practice is exactly how you will perform in the real world.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com/ to learn how to cut men’s hair with high quality online barber videos.

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How to be a Barber – Customer Service Tips – Part 1:

When teaching a class at a barber school or cosmetology school I like to start by asking an important question: What business are you planning on going into after you graduate? I first get a few laughs as if it is a silly question followed by a bunch of different answers:

– I am going into the barber business
– I am going in to the cosmetology business
– I am going to the skin care business
– I am going in to the manicure and pedicure business

These are all good answers showing the students have a plan. What I never here is the most important thing that no student can afford to overlook. No matter what area of barbering/cosmetology you plan to practice, you are in the CUSTOMER SERVICE business first. Without good people skills it does not matter how good you are at your chosen area of expertise. Customers do business with people that make them feel welcome and special. Customers also do business with people that show passion, caring, and excitement for what they do.

The reason customer service skills are so important is that these are the things your customers will notice and be exposed to before the service you are providing them is completed. In other words their opinion is formed before you even show them the finish product.

Learn more about how to be a barber at www.MastersOfBarbering.com

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How to Fade Hair: How high to cut the fade? – Part 1:

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, head shape, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

This article will cover head shape. If the client has a rectangular shaped head there are a more options. You can fade the hair high, medium, or low and it will look balanced. If the client has a round shaped head DO NOT fade the hair higher than the widest point of the head. This will lead to an unbalanced looking haircut. If the client has a protruding occipital bone (big lump in the back of his head), fade the hair low below the bone.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com to view examples of the different types of fade haircuts and keep an eye out for follow up articles on this topic.

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Barber Supplies, Tools, and Equipment – Part 3: Getting the most out of the Adjustable Clipper

Throughout my career as an educator I have taught at barber and cosmetology schools hundreds of times. I was teaching at a new school last week and I was demonstrating a tapered neckline with an adjustable clipper. I was using the terminology opening and closing the blade and I received 2 questions I have not heard before. What does opening and closing the blade mean? And, what is the lever for?

This was a surprise to me as I assumed all students were familiar with an adjustable clipper. This particular school does not have an adjustable clipper in their kit so I feel it is very important that I cover this topic in detail.

The lever adjusts the length of the blade. When the lever is pushed toward the cutting blade it is called closing the blade and will cut the hair shorter. As the lever is pushed away from the cutting blade it is called opening the blade and will leave the hair longer. There are also a few lengths in between depending on the make and model of the clipper which makes the adjustable clipper ideal for skin/bald fades and tapered outlines.

Stay tuned for “Getting the most out of the Adjustable Clipper (continued)” where I will cover the benefits of using this clipper for the clipper over comb haircutting technique.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.comfor more info on the adjustable clipper as well as many other barbering tools.

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Barber Supplies, Tools, and Equipment – Part 2: How to avoid leaving razor burn with your trimmer

Razor burn left on the neck after giving haircut can seriously hurt your customer satisfaction and retention rate. It is an extremely important issue that needs to be addressed early on in your barber education as you learn how to cut men’s hair.

Let me explain what I mean by razor burn. It can be as slight as a light red mark left on the back of the neck or as severe as bright red marks with broken skin. The more sensitive the skin the worse it gets.

Fortunately there is an extremely simple solution. First, you must understand how a clipper blade is designed to cut hair properly. There are two blades. One is stationary (does not move) and the other is mobile (moves back and forth). The stationary blade picks up the hair and holds it and the mobile blade (also known as the cutting blade) moves back and forth and cuts the hair.

Now you understand how the blade works but how do I avoid the razor marks? The answer is very simple. DO NOT drag the clipper in a downward motion after making the outline. Turn the clipper around and shave the hair in an upward motion. This way the hair will feed into the clipper blade properly. The stationary blade will pick up the hair and the mobile blade will cut it.

If you still are unsure look at your trimmer closely. Notice how close the cutting blade is to the stationary blade. Even the lightest pressure to the skin will expose the skin to the cutting blade causing the different levels of razor burn. Experiment by touching your finger to the blade and press down LIGHTLY and you will see what I mean.

I can’t stress enough the importance of learning this lesson early on in your barber education. This one simple yet important tip will increase your customer satisfaction and retention levels in a BIG way.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.comto learn more about this and many other barber supplies and tool tips.

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Continuing Your Barber Education

The first step to any good barber education is the proper schooling. Going to a good barber or cosmetology school is the START of your foundation as a barber or men’s hairstylist. After school the real work starts.

I cannot stress enough the importance of finding a good mentor. This person can come in the form of an owner or manager of the barber shop you are going to work for, a co-worker, or someone you know and respect from another shop

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The first thing to look for in a mentor is a barber’s ability to teach (really teach) you the barbering trade. Make sure they can explain and are willing to explain everything in an easy to understand manner. This is the best way to further your barber education in the beginning of your career.

The next thing to look for in barbering mentor is someone with above average skill whose work you would like to duplicate. What you do not want is a barber who is very good and is just looking to show off their skills and impress you. This may seem attractive at first but the goal is to learn as much as you can in a way that you will be able to reproduce the haircuts being shown to you. It is my feeling that when someone has an above average skill level, their work will speak for itself. It is of no benefit to you to keep hearing from them how great they are. The best teachers are those who are humble and grateful for their ability ,want to share all of their knowledge with you, and help you succeed.

If you are unable to find a good mentor or would like to supplement your continuing barber education online please visit www.MastersOfBarbering.com. There are easy to follow lessons on topics including the tools of the trade, barber supplies, haircutting techniques, a variety of classic and current men’s hairstyles, beard trims, and numerous lessons on straight razor shaving. Each lesson includes video, written descriptions, and diagrams to help move you through the learning curve of your barber education as fast as possible. Good luck and remember hard work and a lot of practice will always be rewarded.

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Haircutting Techniques Part 1 – How to cut hair when it is too short to short pick up with your fingers

Many times when beginning a career in barbering or men’s haircutting the barber or cosmetologist will struggle the most in one particular situation. This is when giving a haircut the hair is too short to pick up with your fingers and the desired length is to be left longer than using the largest clipper attachment. Now what? or a look of confusion is what I get from the student. In my opinion this is where the truly talented are separated from the average.

There are two haircutting techniques that are used in this situation. The first one is called scissor over comb. This haircutting technique is when the comb slowly moves through the hair picking it up and the scissor held in the opposite hand opens and closes quickly cutting the hair. This is the oldest technique in barbering. (Yes, there was a time when the electric clipper did not exist.) With time and practice this technique will become second nature and you will start using it on longer hair instead of picking it up. You will find this haircutting technique to be much more efficient as well as more accurate than picking up the hair in many sections.

The second haircutting technique is clipper over comb. This works the same as scissor over comb except you are using a clipper. I recommend using an adjustable clipper or detachable blade clipper but never a trimmer. The trimmer is not powerful enough and the blade is too fine causing clipper lines in the haircut. Another benefit too this technique is you can begin the taper around the outline of the haircut after you finish each section. This will drastically increase the efficiency of your haircutting without increasing your hand speed. It is extremely important that the customer never feels like you are rushing them out of your chair.

This is the first blog of a multi-part series on men’s haircutting techniques.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.comto learn about these men’s haircutting techniques and much more.

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Barber Tools, Supplies, and Equipment: What you need as a professional barber – Part 1

Welcome to the first blog in a series of posts about barber tools, supplies, and equipment. Everyone has heard the saying “You are what you eat”. The same is true for your tools. You are only as good as your tools. It is impossible to give a great men’s haircut without the proper tools. You may get by with a good haircut once in a while with average tools but who wants to settle for good when greatness is possible.

Barber tools fall in to three main categories: Clippers, combs, and scissors. You must have a combination of all three to have a complete kit.

For the clippers we recommend having three. A powerful detachable blade clipper will help you remove a lot of thick hair or wet hair at once. It will also aid in cutting fade haircuts easier because the power will help to avoid leaving lines to blend out. The next clipper will be an adjustable clipper, which are perfect for cutting tapered/faded hairlines. You can easily get 4-5 blade sizes just by moving the lever. The last clipper you will need is a trimmer. This will be used for cutting outlines and shaving neck hair.

We recommend having three pairs of scissors. You will need a smaller scissor for cutting hair over your fingers which should be 5-6 ½ inches in length. A larger scissor is needed for cutting hair with the scissor over the comb technique. This scissor should be 6 ½ -8 ½ inches in length. A longer scissor allows for better control of the hair. The last scissor needed is a 40-44 tooth blending scissor. This will allow you to either blend or texturize the haircut for the perfect finish.

You will need both clipper combs and scissor combs. Your clipper comb should have a handle and the teeth should be smooth so the clipper will not get stuck on the grooves. A medium size and a larger one (flat top comb) will do the trick. You should also have a larger scissor comb for handling a lot of thick hair and a small one (finishing comb) or the fine work around the ears and on the hairline.

With the proper tools and education the sky is the limit.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.comfor more detailed video and written instruction on the Tools of the Trade.

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