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Tag Archives | fade haircut

Clipper Cutting – Learn How To Cut Hair With Clippers

This is the first in the Masters of Barbering Video Blog Series covering a wide variety of topics. This video follows up on a previous blog teaching the correct way to describe a clipper cut. It is much more professional to educate your clients on how they get their hairctu by the blade measurement and not a number. This will make your customer feel important and unique giving him one more reason to keep coming back!

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Clipper Cutting: Clipper Maintenance

You are only as good as your tools so it is extremely important to have the best clippers available. As stated in previous blogs we recommend you have three clippers to complete your barbering kit: A detachable blade clipper, an adjustable clipper, and a trimmer. It is equally important to take care of your clippers. There is a four step process required to keep your clippers clean and in good working condition:

1. Use a clipper brush to gently brush of your clipper blades in between every use. This will keep off any wet hair which can cause the blade to rust. It will also avoid getting the previous clients hair on the next client. Lastly, removing the excess hair will keep the blade moving back and forth at maximum speed and efficiency.

2. Spray disinfectant on the clippers after brushing them off. Point the can away from you and spray the clipper blade while it is running. This will kill any germs or viruses and keep the blade clean.

3. Lubricate the blades. Use quality clipper oil and place a small amount of oil on the clipper blade wherever you see metal rubbing against metal. This will allow the blade to run smother and extend the life of the motor.

4. Blade wash your blades at the end of the work day. While the clipper is running dip just the blade in the solution for 10 seconds. Lift it out of the solution and let the loose hair drip out of the blades and dry them off. All of that loose hair keeps the blade from running at optimum speed. This will also kill any germs or viruses.

Maintaining your clippers like this on a daily basis will keep them in excellent working condition for a long time.

Please check out the rest of the Masters Of Barbering website for the best in online clipper cutting education.

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Clipper Cutting: The Art Of The Taper – Part 2

In the barbering world the word taper is used often. It can mean many things and be very confusing. By definition a tapered haircut means shorter hair around the perimeter of the haircut gradually getting longer. Sometimes it makes more sense to think of it as longer hair tapered down to shorter hair. It is really that simple. That is all a taper or tapered means.

The best way to finish off a haircut is with a tapered neckline. A tapered neckline is a natural looking hairline. In other words instead of a line on the back of the neck it is faded out making it look more natural and professional.

I am not sure if it is because I have been thinking about this topic a lot but I have seen more squared off hairlines than ever. As mentioned previously the correct way to finish off a haircut is to taper the neckline. If a man absolutely wants a squared off hairline there is a correct way and wrong way to do it.

The correct way to square off a hairline is to go through the steps to taper it out and at the very end make a straight line with the trimmer. Make sure this line is a low as possible and the portion of the hair graduating from shorter to longer is still visible.

The wrong way to square off a hairline is to cut the sides and back to one length and then square it off without any graduation. Even worse is to cut this line higher than the natural hairline. This can ruin the best of haircuts.

With any man’s haircut a natural finish is best. It shows a different level of professionalism and education. There are a lot of licensed barbers and cosmetologists out there. This is a great way for you to differentiate yourself and increase your retention rate.

Please check out the rest of the Masters Of Barbering website to learn more clipper cutting techniques.

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Clipper Cutting: Please Don’t Cut By Numbers – Part 3

Barbering or Men’s haircutting is a great business to be in and can be fun and rewarding. Being a barber can also give you a good steady income with job security. The barber business is a respected profession which should be taken seriously. We are all fortunate to be making our living this way in relaxed and relatively stress free atmosphere.

In previous blogs I wrote about why it is not a good idea to cut by numbers. In this blog I am going to give you the basic sizes of attachments and metal blades that will make it more professional and descriptive than clipper cutting by numbers.

The standard blade/attachment sizes from longest to shortest are:
– 1/2”
– 3/8”
– 1/4”
– 1/8”
– 1/16”
Anything size longer than ½” you are better off cutting with clipper over comb. Any size shorter is your adjustable clipper without an attachment, or a trimmer for the shortest. Those numbers are standard and they are: 1, 0A, 000, 0000, 00000.

When talking with the customer about how short they like to get their fade cut it is much more personalized and professional referring to the actual sizes than clipper cutting by numbers.

Stay tuned for the next blog in this series that will give real life examples to explain to customers how they get their haircut and how they should ask for it next time in the barbershop/hair salon.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the very best in clipper cutting education.

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How to Fade Hair: How High to Cut the Fade – Part 4: Cowlicks

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, length of the bangs, shape of the head, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

In this blog I am going to discuss how to deal with cowlicks. Even though I could write a book on all the different kinds of cowlicks I am going to keep it simple in this short article. The first and most important thing I would like you to always remember is what I have been telling my students and barbers for years: “IT IS ONLY A COWLICK IF YOU CUT IT TOO SHORT ”. This may sound over simplified but if you don’t cut the hair too short in the crown or the pivot area the hair will not stick up. There is nothing worse than a customer walking out of a barbershop or hair salon with his hair standing up in the back.

The most difficult cowlicks to deal with are the ones on top of the head in the crown area. They can be closer to the top of the head, all the way down by occipital bone in the back, or somewhere in between.

– Always make sure to layer the top first. This will remove the weight and give you a guide to blend to. If there is too much hair on top you will lose sight of the cutting blade and most likely go too high with the clipper. If you go too high it is too late to recover.
– Depending on how strong the cowlick is or how much the hair wants to stick up or out you need to leave anywhere from an inch to three inches from the base of the cowlick for blending.
– If the cowlick is closer to the top of the head you can usually fade past the occipital bone (round of the head).
– If the cowlick is lower let the occipital bone (round of the head) push the clipper blade away from the head in an arcing motion. This will leave you enough room to blend.

Dealing with cowlicks correctly is one of the top ways you can keep a customer for life. This is the customer who has rarely received good haircuts in their life. They will appreciate you and their tip will definitely reflect that.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for the best in online barbering education, barber videos, and many lessons featuring how to fade hair demonstrations.

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How to Cut Hair: Clipper Cutting – Part 1

Clipper cutting techniques are some of the most important techniques you need to learn in your barbering education. Short hairstyles are back in a big way and here to stay. This is huge for the barbering industry and your career as a barber. Clipper cut customers on average get their haircut every 1-3 weeks which means big income potential from each customer.

That being said the short clipper cut customers tend to be very fussy. They know exactly what they want and will notice any imperfection in their haircut. If you can make them happy you have a customer for life. Another benefit is clipper cut customers have big mouths. They are not embarrassed to tell everyone they know where they got their haircut and how great their barber is.

Keep in mind when you are giving a clipper cut that your haircut will be a walking advertisement. Everywhere that customer goes your haircut is on display. Clipper cut customers think nothing of walking up to a guy they don’t know who has a great haircut and asking: Where did you get that hair cut? This works both ways though. If there is a shadow or line of demarcation in the haircut guys will also ask: Where did you get that haircut? Clipper cut customers look out for each other as well.

Please visit www.MastersOfBarbering.com for the very best in online clipper cutting education.

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How to Fade Hair: How High to Cut the Fade – Part 2:

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high it is going to be. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, head shape, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. I will say it another way. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

In this blog I am going to cover scars. When you are asking the customer how high they like their fade make sure to ask them if they have any scars. If you are uncomfortable asking the customer that question, just spend an extra few seconds combing through the hair in an upward motion so when the hair is lifted you will see any scars. You will most likely find scars in 2 areas. In the temple region and/or on the occipital area which is just above the nape of the neck. If the scars are any lower than that there is not a lot that can be done. They are most likely going to show no matter what. Just make sure the customer know that before you give them the fade.

If you find scars in the higher areas leave the hair thicker or darker in those areas and fade the hair low. When cutting the fade start arching the blade or floating the blade away from the scalp about ½ inch below the scars so you have room to fade the hair just below the them. If you go any higher you will run into the scars and they will show.

Please visit http://www.mastersofbarbering.com for barber videos and written instructions covering how to fade hair.

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How to Be a Barber – Professionalism in the Barbershop – Part 1:

This is one of my favorite topics and a major contributing factor to a long profitable career. I would like to start out this topic with what I feel is one of the most important things you can do in the barbershop when you are learning how to be a barber:

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

This topic ties in to a lot of questions that I hear when teaching:

– How come I can’t charge more for a haircut?
– Why aren’t I getting better tips?
– Why am I not getting the customer’s with high paying jobs?
– Why do people treat me like I am just here to serve them instead of like professional?

I have been cutting hair in the barbershop for 20 years and I have felt like this myself at different times in my career as well.

I am going to answer these questions with more questions:

– Do you dress like you are worth more for a haircut?
– Do you dress like you take your job seriously?
– Do you dress like the customer’s with those higher paying jobs?
– Do you dress like a professional?

I highly recommend wearing a nice pair of dress pants with a freshly ironed, long sleeve, dress shirt with a collar. A knee length skirt is also very professional for female barbers. For both men and women if you really want to impress you can never go wrong with a tie. Make sure to finish off with a pair of comfortable, shined, dress shoes. If you are going to wear a barber smock I still recommend wearing the professional attire underneath. Look at any turn of the century barbershop photos and this is exactly what you will see.

If you follow these guidelines you will be amazed at the difference in the way your customers interact with you and the increase in your tips. All of this will allow you to raise your prices on consistent basis as the demand for your service increases.

Please visit www.MastersOfBarbering.com for the very best in online barber videos and more tips on how to become a barber.

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